knowledge management

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The Facilitation Of Knowledge Transfer In Organisations

Knowledge transfer within organisations has always been a prominent topic in our current knowledge economy. Many leaders, practitioners and employees in different industries seem to have their own angle of understanding and interpretation on this particular issue. But I can say with no doubt that most organisations have centered their Knowledge Management practices only on technology and they are relying on tools such as portals and other automated systems as the core of their Knowledge Management processes and solutions. There’s [...]

Ineffective Knowledge Transfer Hindering Business Continuity

The state of rampant change in our organisations limits the ability to establish efficient business continuity – Aiden Choles Our organisations are operating in the midst of concurrent change. In this case we are referring more to internal changes that are constantly occurring within organizations, changes such as new employees expanding our teams, stuff turnovers, shifts in management and also mergers between companies. These changes have become common in the business environment but yet remain a hiccup to most of [...]

KM defined

KM (or Knowledge Management) is quite a hot topic nowadays.  There seem to be two factions, 1 believes that KM in it's existing form is a dying discipine, the other refuses to believe that.  These discussions get quite emotional, which I guess is a good thing as it shows the passion for the subject on both sides of the spectrum. Personally I believe that most decision makers have developed a level of cynicism toward traditional KM, mostly I believe because [...]

Unconscious Incompetence

We all know them, people who think that they are experts on a certain topic (in extreme cases on all topics!) when in fact they know very little.  I recently found out that there is actually a name for this - it's called the Dunning-Kruger effect which is defined as: "the phenomenon wherein people who have little knowledge think that they know more than others who have much more knowledge" It's named for Justin Kruger and David Dunning who first demonstrated the phenomenon [...]

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